Topic

Seeds You Will Need

Topic Progress:

The Essentials

Barley – Can be planted in the spring and winter and has the best results when it is planted early in the season. This grain has loads of health benefits and a variety of purposes, such as feeding livestock, grinding the grains for flour, as well as making beer. Barley is high in dietary fiber and manganese.

Beans – Beans should be planted in the early summer. They are one of the easiest vegetables to grow. Beans have different varieties such as pole beans and bush beans, kidney beans, chickpeas, lima beans, red/black/white beans, pintos, etc. Pole beans begin and end earlier than bush beans. In comparison, pole beans give a higher yield. A stake is needed for pole beans. Staggering your plantings will give continuous yields. Beans are very high in fiber, calcium, Vitamins A, C and K.

Broccoli – Plant broccoli seeds in mid-to-late summer so they can be ready for the fall harvest. Broccoli is one of the easiest vegetables to grow. This plant has a tendency to yield past its first harvest and can take light frost without a problem. Broccoli is a good source of protein, Vitamins A and K.

Carrot – Carrots prefer cooler weather and should be grown in the fall, winter and early spring. They are one of the easiest vegetables to grow. They are very high in beta carotene and vitamin A.

Cauliflower – Cauliflower is a cool season vegetable. It harvests over a short period of time and cuts out a high head yield. Cauliflower is high in dietary fiber, Vitamin C and K.

Corn – Corn is a warm weather crop and should be planted after the last frost. Corn supplies a good amount of protein, calcium and iron. The corn plant produces two ears per stalk.

Cucumber – Cucumber is a warm weather crop and one of the easiest vegetables to grow. There are large varieties and smaller varieties for pickling. Continuous picking increases the cucumber plant’s production. Cucumbers are good sources of Vitamins A, C, K and potassium.

Eggplant – Eggplants are warm weather plants and should be planted after the last frost. This vegetable is a night shade and is high in fiber, antioxidants, and a good source of vitamins B1 and B6. This is a very versatile vegetable to cook with as it can provide great variety for your pallet.

Lettuce – Plant lettuce two weeks before the last frost, as well as, in the fall 6-8 weeks before first frost date. Lettuce is one of the easiest vegetables to grow and one of the earliest crops to harvest. There are many different varieties offering various nutritional benefits. This plant grows quickly and harvest can be extended by taking a few leaves at a time. Lettuce is packed with essential vitamins along with: protein, iron and calcium and Vitamins A, B6, C, and K.

Melon – Plant melon 4 weeks after the last frost as these fruits are intolerant to cold weather. Cantaloupes and melon varieties need lots of space to grow. Getting the dwarf size of these fruits can save space. One melon plant will produce two melons. Melons are a good source of fiber, B6 and folate.

Okra – Plant Okra 2 weeks after the last frost. This vegetable has a variety of uses such as: in soups, pickled or canned. Okra is high in Vitamin A, K and folate, and calcium.

Onions/Garlic – Onions and garlic are among the easiest vegetables to grow. Plant your onions in mid-to-late October. Onions can be pulled earlier and used for green onions. They are a good source of dietary fiber, Vitamin B6, Vitamin C, folate and potassium.

Peanuts – The peanut is a hot season plant and should be planted from April until Early June. Peanuts are a good source for healthy fats, Vitamin E, protein and antioxidants.

Peas – Peas are a winter loving plant which and are resistant to frost. Peas are among the easiest vegetables to grow. There are many varieties of the pea plant, such as shelling, snap, snow and sugar pod. Most varieties are fast growing. Peas are a good source of protein, fiber and provide a good supply of 8 different vitamins including Vitamin A, B6, and K.

Peppers – Peppers grow after last frost. There are many varieties of peppers as well as choices between hot and mild. Sweet peppers are one of the easiest vegetables to grow. The more peppers are harvested, the more the plant will produce. Peppers are high in Vitamin A and C.

Potatoes – Plant potatoes 4-6 weeks before last frost. 1 plant yields 5-6 young potatoes. Potatoes are high in fiber, Vitamin B6, Potassium and
Vitamin C.

Pumpkin – Start pumpkin seeds in the late spring. Pumpkins require lots of room for their vines to grow. Pumpkins are packed with thiamine, niacin, Vitamin B6, folate, iron, Vitamin A, C and E.

Radish – Radishes can be started 4-6 weeks before last frost. Many folks have had success growing radishes in the fall, as well. One of the easiest vegetables to grow. They are very tolerant of weather conditions. Radishes are high in Vitamin B6, dietary fiber, Vitamin C and iron.

Spinach – Spinach grows best in cool weather, but some varieties like warm weather. Many call Spinach a super food based on its abundance of Vitamin A, C, iron, thiamine, thiamine and folic acid.

Squash – There both summer squash and winter squash varieties. It is among the easiest vegetables to grow and most are prolific producers. Picking squash regularly encourages a higher yield. Squash is an excellent source of Vitamin A, B6, C, K, and dietary fiber.

Tomato – Plant tomatoes in the late spring and again in the late summer. One of the easiest vegetables to grow. Tomatoes are a good source of Vitamin A, C, K, E, Potassium, thiamine and Niacin.

Turnips/Rutabagas – Seeds should be sown in late May or early summer. Turnips are fairly disease free and easily cared for. The greens can be eaten along with the roots. Turnips are high in B6, Vitamin C, Iron and Calcium.

Wheat – Winter wheat can be planted from late September to mid-October. This is the preferred variety due to its nutritional content as well as the protection it provides the soil in the wintertime compared to spring wheat. Spring wheat is planted in early spring. This is one of the most commonly used food crops in the world. Wheat is high in copper, zinc, iron and potassium. Planting a 10×10 plot will yield between 10-25 loaves of bread.

Course Discussion