Topic

Types of G.O.O.D.I.E Bags

Topic Progress:

5 minute, 15 minute, 30 minute G.O.O.D.I.E. Bags

The main difference between G.O.O.D.I.E’s is the amount of time that it will take you to prepare them. The best way to get organized and prepared is to work backwards. That means that you should build your 30 minute bag first, moving down to the 15 minute bag, before finishing with the 5 minute bag. This way you can zero in the items that you truly need to take with you, versus the items you would simply like to have. You should treat this as a game at the start; get the whole family involved. As time goes by, however, you should get more serious.

Remember that not all family members will be interested in practicing this, it is important that you do not impose it upon them. There are board games, worst case scenario as family time games, and children’s versions of the worst case scenario books that may help to spike an interest in children.

Think of it as getting yourself in shape for a marathon. At first, you will walk and jog. Then you will run. Then sprint. Finally, you will incorporate everything into a running strategy for the big race.

You should perform this exercise with the help of a stopwatch. The first step is to make a list of items you think may be necessary. In addition to the items listed above, you may want to add:

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  • a multi-tool
  • lighters
  • a compass
  • a can opener
  • pairing knife
  • garbage bags
  • plastic utensils
  • paper cups and plate
  • granola or energy bars
  • paper towels
  • tube socks
  • underwear
  • anti-biotic cream
  • tweezers
  • gauze pads
  • band aids
  • empty medicine bottles
  • aspirin
  • adhesive tape
  • baby formula/diapers/wipes
  • personal or feminine hygiene items

There is no limit to the amount of items to start out with. Just keep in mind that you can only carry so much.

At this point, let your stopwatch run. Have a sheet of paper and a pen ready. Set yourself and begin. Move briskly through your home collecting the items listed above and anything else that you think you may need. Do not panic, but be swift and cognizant of the time ticking away. Every time you add an item to your go bag, check it off the list. When the 30 minutes are up, stop.

At this point, you have your 30 minute G.O.O.D.I.E. Bag. Empty it and start over, this time stopping the exercise after 15 minutes. Close with the 5 minute bag. After performing this drill once, you will have an idea of its purpose. You want to know precisely what it is that you need and how long it will take you to assemble all of those items in your go bag. It is great if you can have your 30 minute G.O.O.D.I.E Bag ready and waiting. If you are a master at compartmentalization and can carry heavy loads, you may be one of the few folks capable of putting together a 60 minute G.O.O.D.I.E Bag. It is your 5 minute G.O.O.D.I.E Bag, however, that will be your greatest signal as to which items you need have handy.

Even though you should always have a 30 minute G.O.O.D.I.E Bag prepared, it is prudent to have an idea of what you will need to pack in case you only have 5 minutes available. Unfortunately, most people do not take the time to assemble an actual G.O.O.D.I.E Bag in advance, thinking they will have time on the spot. This exercise has the dual purpose of showing you what you need and perhaps more importantly, showing you why you need a G.O.O.D.I.E Bag, right now.

Course Discussion